ENTREPRENEUR BIZ TIPS: How I hacked an ultramarathon by thinking like an entrepreneur | Phil Sanderson | TEDxBeaconStreet

ENTREPRENEUR BIZ TIPS: How I hacked an ultramarathon by thinking like an entrepreneur | Phil Sanderson | TEDxBeaconStreet

Here’s Great Tip: How I hacked an ultramarathon by thinking like an entrepreneur | Phil Sanderson | TEDxBeaconStreet


Here is Something You Should See…


This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Phil Sanderson, an entrepreneur and venture capitalist, has run over 40 ultra marathons ranging from 31 to 100 miles. For the first time last September, he ran the Wasatch 100-miler in the Utah mountains with almost no training (don’t try that at home). Sanderson explains how he “hacked” the race by drawing from an unlikely strategy– entrepreneurship. Based on his work funding entrepreneurs, Sanderson identifies the fundamental hacking principles used by the most successful entrepreneurs — and describes how he applied these principles to achieve his goal of finishing a 100-mile race in under 30 hours.

Phil Sanderson has been a venture capitalist for 18 years and is a partner at IDG Ventures in San Francisco. He is an ultra distance runner having competed in over 40 ultramarathons. Phil is Chairman of the Western Association of Venture Capitalists and the VCNetwork. He received an MBA from Harvard Business School.

About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

14 Replies to “ENTREPRENEUR BIZ TIPS: How I hacked an ultramarathon by thinking like an entrepreneur | Phil Sanderson | TEDxBeaconStreet”

  1. Agreed that these hacks are pretty much the norm for any ultrarunner. But his true "hack" is using the shock/horror of ultrarunning to get the audience to pay attention to the talk.

  2. I run a lot of ultras from 50K to 100 milers too and I can tell you, unless it's genetics or some "type" of training(doesn't have to be big), you will need that. When I transitioned from marathons to ultras, the biggest change was climbing hills and Wasatch 100 is a VERY HILLY race so you can't just show up and not be good at hills for that. Day hiking(anywhere from 8-14 hrs generally) was the one habit that helped my ultramarathons because I learned to be on the feet on a long time and continuance elevation changes. I love ultramarathoners but I just don't buy this speaker's agenda.

  3. Neat TEDx talk, thanks for sharing. Here are the key points:

    1. Have a great support team.
    2. Have a malleable business plan (adapt and overcome).
    3. KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) He maintained his heart rate at 150-155, ate 200 calories every 20 minutes, and drank 2lbs of liquid every hour to maintain performance.

    Bonus:
    4. Have fun!

  4. Hmmm… with all due and very considerable respect to anyone who has ever run 100 miles in less than 30 (or even 48 ) hours, including the speaker, Mr. Sanderson's definition of "hacked," seems to be, "just do what every ultra runner always does every time they run a race."  However, Mr. Sanderson deserves kudos for "hacking" his way onto the TED stage for a talk that amounts to brief discussion of the basics of ultra running strategy.   PS:  Ultra running should be elevated to an Olympic sport for men and women.

  5. The only way someone could run 100 miles with little or no training can be summed up in one word: genetics. This tool's "brilliant insight" is bullshit. Take it from someone who runs 9 miles a day and runs marathons. No training = YOU ARE FUCKED.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *